Attention Span and Online Learning Experiences

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 12 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #16839 Reply
      Tamara
      Keymaster

      What is the average attention span in an online environment?  How can you create learning experiences that accomodate short attention spans?  What ideas and strategies do you have for accommodating a short attention span in an online learning environment? How can you use the attention span information in designing your online learning communities?

    • #16851 Reply
      Charley Collins

      The attention span of a student online is very short. Its really just 15-20 minutes. I want to have activites that have things integrated so that the student are not just sitting in front of the computer. By understanding that students have a shorter attention span learning online, it is essential to understand this during lesson planning. I want to keep the activites short and not too hard to complete on their own. Students should be able to feel like the can accomplish tasks.

    • #16853 Reply
      Suzanne

      Attention span during online learning cycles in and out, and is shorter than the attention span in a live class. Material may be boring or unfamiliar, so it’s hard to keep focusing. It’s also very tempting to look at texts, instagram feed etc. It’s difficult not to respond to what is seen or heard in the environment. It may be necessary to address a child’s question, or separate fighting children, for example.
      To address this situation, present material in small chunks, with a 2-3 question quiz at the end of each chunk of material. Present a colorful picture that connects with the material, or play a short video about the material. Keep units short, so they can be finished in a short period of time. That way, when disruptions come, perhaps one chunk of material will be finished, and it will not be so hard to get back to the next piece of material.

    • #16855 Reply
      Suzanne

      Attention span during online learning cycles in and out, and is shorter (about 10 minutes) than the attention span in a live class. Material may be boring or unfamiliar, so it’s hard to keep focusing. It’s also very tempting to look at texts, instagram feed etc. It’s difficult not to respond to what is seen or heard in the environment. It may be necessary to address a child’s question, or separate fighting children, for example.
      To address this situation, present material in small chunks, with a 2-3 question quiz at the end of each chunk of material. Present a colorful picture that connects with the material, or play a short video about the material. Keep units short, so they can be finished in a short period of time. That way, when disruptions come, perhaps one chunk of material will be finished, and it will not be so hard to get back to the next piece of material

    • #16856 Reply
      Suzanne

      Attention span during online learning cycles in and out, and is shorter than the attention span in a live class. Material may be boring or unfamiliar, so it’s hard to keep focusing. It’s also very tempting to look at texts, instagram feed etc. It’s difficult not to respond to what is seen or heard in the environment. It may be necessary to address a child’s question, or separate fighting children, for example.
      To address this situation, present material in small chunks, with a 2-3 question quiz at the end of each chunk of material. Present a colorful picture that connects with the material, or play a short video about the material. Keep units short, so they can be finished in a short period of time. That way, when disruptions come, perhaps one chunk of material will be finished, and it will not be so hard to get back to the next piece of material

    • #16857 Reply
      Sherry

      The average attention span in an online environment is about 8 to 12 minutes where college students were measured at a 21 minutes’ peak. Learning experiences to accommodate this level of attention include short concepts covered in mini lessons with added humor or bizarre, attention-grabbing items for students to be jolted back into the lessons.(In class, this would be my using a high, squeaky voice or to pause for reactions after saying something silly to wait for giggles.) In an online learning environment, strategies for accommodating weak attention spans could be sound, color, interesting photos, or blank spaces to get students to focus. The attention span information helps me to not assume students are paying attention and to break lessons down further than those offered in class lectures.

    • #16861 Reply
      Brandy

      Attention span online is about 2-3 minutes. I want to provide short, engaging activities/videos. I will then follow up with either a discussion post or short question/ quiz to check for understanding.

    • #16866 Reply
      Susan Shoemaker

      Since the online attention span is only about 2 to 3 minutes, which is significantly reduced from the 10 to 15 minute rule of thumb in a face-to-face environment, very creative and dynamic instruction is required. I am thinking about the Prager University YouTube videos which are very short bursts of knowledge, usually less than 7 minutes; now I understand why they are so short! I am remembering those School House Rock commercials from my youth, again they were just a few minutes in length and set to a catchy jingle.
      Accordingly, these would be the strategies that I would employ in creating lesson plans; short, pointed, and memorable. Don’t ask me about specifics yet, I haven’t gotten that far! But I am thinking about creating musical jingles…

    • #16868 Reply
      Sergio

      In order to address attention span I try to present activities in small chunks, with very precise and clear instructions. But even though the activities require a very short time to complete them, I usually need to reinforce them with messages.
      I have also noticed that for certain sectors, the phone can become an ideal complete for online instructions. When students hear the instructor’s voice, they can refocus on their activities again.

    • #16870 Reply
      Kimberly Libby

      The average attention span in an online environment is only 2-3 minutes! In order to accommodate short attention spans, I will need to separate my information into smaller pieces that can be “consumed” and completed in shorter amounts of time. This will be more effective if I also lighten the cognitive load for students by activating prior knowledge, using pictures, and emphasizing keywords.

      Attention is cyclical – after a period of engagement, it will naturally start to diffuse. I can help manage learners’ attention by varying the way information is presented (for example, alternating between low, medium, and high engagement activities). This could mean switching between slide presentations, videos, mini-quizzes, responses/reflections, etc. and using strategies like humor and movement.

    • #16889 Reply
      Amanda Hanley

      The average attention span in an online learning environment is 2-3 minutes. In order to maintain engagement, we need to vary activities that we do. I often interchange “fun” activities with more arduous ones during a class.
      We use books, workbooks, Chromebooks, index cards, handouts, etc and I find it helps to jump from the different mediums or types of activities. I am working on increasing my knowledge of the types of activities online. I have found that having a load of activities in my browser to present during a class helps, it gives learners a variety and also to utilize the chat box the students often race to post answers there. I encourage the learners who have participated in an activity or discussion to call on the next student to participate that seems to help because the students always call on anyone who seems to have become disengaged.

    • #16940 Reply
      Chantelle Hidalgo

      The average attention span for online learners is 2-3 minutes. To best accommodate a short attention span it would be beneficial to present information in smaller pieces. Attention also cycles through periods of engagement and diffusion. We need to create short lessons of information using colorful, creative materials and as the student begins to diffuse try to pull them back in and engage them in learning again.

    • #19637 Reply
      Bruno

      Question: What is the average attention span in an online environment?  How can you create learning experiences that accommodate short attention spans?  What ideas and strategies do you have for accommodating a short attention span in an online learning environment? How can you use the attention span information in designing your online learning communities?

      The average attention span in an online environment is 2-3 minutes. To accommodate short attention spans, educators should divide longer eLearning into chunk sized modules. Gamifying the eLearning experience by integrating badges, points, or leaderboards. Lesson should always be simple and straight forward and focus on immediate learning objectives. Last but not least, integrate pause points and give students a break. Learners with short attention spans often need an out from time to time.

      I can use the attention span information in designing my online course by implementing some of the already stated strategies, but also make it more interactive and use different strategies to teach each lesson. I can use web quests, online scavenger hunts, take breaks, play educational games, try and make the experience fun.

Viewing 12 reply threads
Reply To: Attention Span and Online Learning Experiences
Your information:




Skip to toolbar